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What is Backup & Restore?

Key Questions

How much data loss can you tolerate? 

How long can you operate without your lost data?

Are you 100% on what’s in your backups? 

Does the frequency of your backups align with your RPO?

The RPO determines loss tolerance and how much data can be lost

How’s your backup frequency?
If you’re on a 1 week backup frequency, are you willing to redo a weeks’ worth of work? If not, you might want to consider moving the backup frequency to either hourly or daily.

How’s your data integrity? Is anything corrupted?
If you have corrupted files within a restore point/backup, they cannot be restored.

Do you use multiple folders?
Are you 100% that all of those folders are being backed up? You cannot restore what isn’t backed up.

Backup A copy of computer datat taken and stored elsewhere so that it may be used to restore the original after a data loss event

Restore Performed to return data that has been lost, stolen or damaged to its original condition or to move data to a new location.

Recovery point objective (RPO)

The RPO determines loss tolerance and how much data can be lost

How much data are you willing to lose?
1 Month, 1 Week, 1 Day?

It is a planning objective that defines how often data needs to be backed up to enable recovery.

An organization enables RPOs by having a Data Recovery approach in place that backs up data at the right intervals, so the amount of data loss never exceeds it;s determined loss tolerance.

Recovery time objective (RTO)

The RTO comes into play after a loss event.

 

Are you 100% on what’s in your backups?
How long can you operate without your lost data?
1 Month, 1 Week, 1 Day?

It is a planning objective that defines how often data needs to be backed up to enable recovery.

1. How long can you pause operations, or remove resources from operations so they can recreate the lost work?

2. How long can you have full loss of data before it is restored?

 

Differences between RPO and RTO

RPO and RTO work together in a time sequence, with RPO making sure a business has the right data backup policies in place and RTO ensuring it can recover data backups quickly.

Recovery point objective is closely related to recovery time objective, which is the maximum length of time computing resources and application can be down after a failure or disaster. Together, the two approaches enable a BCP and a DR strategy

 

Maximum tolerable downtime (MTD)

For each process in the Business Impact Analysis you need to determine its Maximum Tolerable Downtime (MTD).

Maximum Tolerable Downtime is the time after which the process being unavailable creates irreversible consequences generally, exceeding the MTD results with server damage to the viability of the business. Depending on the process MTD can be in hours, days, or longer. 

Looking to protect your business from data loss?

Because let’s face it- no one likes to do rework. 

Ensure that your data is easily returned to it’s original condition in the event that it is lost, stolen or damaged.